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Honoring a Pioneering Pharmacist, Educator and Researcher

Jerry L. Bauman to receive the UMKC School of Pharmacy Alumni Achievement Award
Jerry Bauman speaks during an event

Each year, the UMKC Alumni Association recognizes the achievements of outstanding alumni with an awards celebration. In 2020, UMKC is honoring Jerry Bauman (Pharm.D. ’78) with the School of Pharmacy Alumni Achievement Award.

Bauman has had a distinguished 40-year career as a pioneering clinical pharmacist, educator, practitioner, researcher and leader. Currently editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, Bauman was dean and distinguished professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy for nearly 12 years. His research on the clinical pharmacology of cocaine and cardiovascular drugs, specifically anti-arrhythmic medicines, earned him international recognition. He recently spoke with us about his career.

You were the first pharmacist elected as a fellow of the American College of Cardiology (ACC). How did that feel?

I was extremely proud to be elected as such. Today, there are quite a few pharmacists who have been elected as fellows in the ACC and I feel as if I, in part, paved the way. Shortly after I was elected, the ACC office called me because they thought I had misprinted my degree — that is how I knew I was the first.

"The Pharm.D. program transformed me into a confident and competent clinical pharmacist."
—Jerry Bauman

Tell us about your internationally-recognized research on the clinical pharmacology of cocaine and cardiovascular drugs.

I developed an interest in arrhythmias at UMKC and Truman Medical Center and then at the University of Illinois at Chicago, I was fortunate to be working with an incredible group of electrophysiologists. There, I began to study drug-induced arrhythmias and eventually saw the similarities between cocaine and anti-arrhythmic agents. We then defined the electrophysiology of cocaine and found agents that could reverse its effects. The agent was sodium bicarbonate, which is still recommended and came from my experience at Truman Medical Center.

How did UMKC contribute to your success?

I can’t overemphasize how it contributed to my success. The Pharm.D. program transformed me into a confident and competent clinical pharmacist. I used the knowledge and skills I developed there to create my academic career, including research programs and teaching style.

Meet the rest of the 2020 UMKC Alumni Awardees

Learn more about School of Pharmacy

Published: Mar 5, 2020

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