June

  • High School Students Get Their Month in Court

    UMKC Law faculty and alumni play major role in effort to attract urban youth to careers in law
    Throughout the month of June, lawyers, judges and law professors are working with urban high school students to introduce them to the legal system and pique their interest in legal careers. UMKC School of law faculty and alumni are playing a major role.  The program is called the Student Law Academy, and it is sponsored by the Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Foundation and PREP-KC, an organization that works with urban school districts in the Kansas City metro to help young people explore their futures.  During the month-long program, high school students will participate in information/mentoring sessions with lawyers, judges and professors on topics such as the Life Cycle of a Lawsuit, Persuasive Public Speaking, Negotiating Styles, TV vs. Reality and School Speech and the First Amendment. “Participating in the Student Law Academy is just one example of our commitment to engage with and serve the community,” said Lorie Paldino, assistant director of Law Admissions for the UMKC School of Law. “Through this program, we are building bridges connecting the community, the legal profession and our students, faculty and alumni to each other, providing valuable opportunities for access, knowledge and networking.” UMKC School of Law faculty leading Academy sessions include Sean O’Brien, Mikah K. Thompson and Daniel B. Weddle. Among the many UMKC alumni participating are Dana Tippin Cutler and Keith A. Cutler, Tim Dollar, Jolie Justus, Sherri Wattenbarger, Michelle Wimes and the Hon. J. Dale Youngs. “The Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Foundation values diversity in the legal profession. Our Student Law Academy program allows our local legal community to take active steps to provide underserved high school students, who would not otherwise have the opportunity, meaningful exposure to different careers within the legal profession,” said Jill M. Katz, 2021 foundation president. “One goal of the academy is to help students create connections with lawyers and judges. These connections are crucial for students as they explore what their futures hold.” Jun 10, 2021

  • A Kansas City Writer With Schizophrenia Hopes Poetry Helps 'Extract The Beauty From The Ugly'

    UMKC student Alexej Savreux has rereleased a collection of poetry that runs the gamut from broken hearts to complex physics theory.
    Alexej Savreux is currently a year into a graduate degree in theater tech at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and recently became a sponsored poet at Poetry for Personal Power. The position uses poetry and art to uplift and support people in need, particularly those with mental health diagnoses. Read the story from KCUR. Jun 10, 2021

  • Study Ranks States on Safety During COVID-19 Pandemic. How did Missouri and Kansas do?

    UMKC's Jenifer Allsworth weighs-in for Flatland article
    Jenifer Allsworth, an epidemiologist and professor at University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, said that had the study been done a few months ago, the states’ rankings would have been more closely aligned. But vaccination rates in Kansas have gone up while infection rates have gone down in recent weeks. Read the article. Jun 09, 2021

  • Women of Color’s Persistence Puts the ‘Still’ in ‘Still We Rise’

    Keynote speaker for Leadership Conference Donna Brazile evokes past leaders to inspire continued action
    Donna Brazile, in the keynote address for this year’s Women of Color Leadership Conference, praised women of color for refusing to give up or give in to the forces trying to hold them back. Brazile, a longtime Democratic Party leader, also encouraged the members of her virtual audience to keep using their voices to further the dream of a just, inclusive America. In an address rich in cultural, historical and culinary references, Brazile said America was strengthened by its diversity and needed to include everyone to be at its best. She said women of color put the “Still” in this year’s conference theme, “Still We Rise.” And she likened women of color to the roux in gumbo, binding everything together and giving the dish spice and body. Without the roux, she said, there’s no gumbo. “It’s just soup.” Brazile also paid homage to Kansas City, saying its communities of color had made vital contributions to American culture, from barbecue to “Charlie Parker’s saxophone.” And she praised the Black entrepreneurs who turned the 18th and Vine area into a vital district long ago, including the Gem Theater and the stadium for the Kansas City Monarchs of Negro Leagues Baseball fame. She also remarked on the Kansas City community’s courage a century ago and wondered how its members must have felt when they learned of the massacre that occurred not so far away in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She marveled at 107-year-old Viola Fletcher, a survivor who as a 7-year-old fled the Tulsa massacre with her family. In the past, Brazile said, she has been inspired by seeing Fletcher testify before Congress and believing in a promising future for all Americans. On Tuesday, Brazile said, she was inspired to see Fletcher with President Biden in Tulsa at the ceremony marking the 100th anniversary of the tragedy. Brazile also drew on words that have encouraged her, including: “It took me quite a long time to develop a voice, and now that I have it, I am not going to be silent.” — Madeline Albright, former secretary of state “Our role is to dream a better world and to work courageously to make that dream possible.” — Isabel Allende, author and activist “Don’t doubt what you know.” — Kerry Washington, actress and producer And in her own words, Brazile summed up, “Together, we are strong, powerful and daring to make a positive difference.” Also on the program for the day were panel discussions on mental health and on solidarity among women of color; Danielle Metz, a former prison inmate whose humanitarian efforts include helping incarcerated girls and women; and ballerina Karen Brown, who spoke on the importance of movement for good health and led an interactive session.  Jun 07, 2021

  • Kansas City In 1960s Gay Rights History

    KCUR talks to Stuart Hinds
    Stuart Hinds, curator of Special Collections and Archives at UMKC and curator of the Gay and Lesbian Archives of Mid America, was a guest on Up to Date.  Jun 05, 2021

  • How Can You Celebrate Pride Month In Kansas City?

    Kansas City Star features event with Stuart Hinds, curator of Special Collections & Archives at the University of Missouri-Kansas City; and Austin ...
    The Mid-Continent Public Library will host an online discussion about the history of LGBTQ activism in Kansas City with Stuart Hinds, curator of Special Collections & Archives at the University of Missouri-Kansas City; and Austin Williams, director of the award-winning documentary The Ordinance Project. Hinds said the event is important because it brings awareness to civil right struggles and forgotten history. Read the Kansas City Star article, which was picked up by MSN. Jun 04, 2021

  • Volunteer's $1.2 Million Gift Ensures Student Support

    Endowment benefits UMKC Conservatory and the Women’s Council Graduate Assistance Fund
    The late Caroline McBride French was an enthusiastic UMKC Conservatory donor and volunteer. A successful attorney in Kansas City, French was active on the Friends of the UMKC Conservatory board, a fervent supporter of Crescendo, the Conservatory’s signature fundraiser and a member of the UMKC Women’s Committee for the UMKC Conservatory. “Music was her primary love,” says Don Dagenais, a longtime Conservatory supporter. “She had a great business sense and made very sophisticated investments. As a woman attorney in her day, she must have been quite a barrier breaker.” Her business acumen and her love for the arts resulted in a generous gift to support academic assistance for students at UMKC. Her estate gift of $800,000 will establish The Caroline McBride French Endowed Scholarship Fund of the UMKC Conservatory. An additional $460,000 will support the William L. and Caroline M. French Graduate Assistance Fund (GAF) named award through the UMKC Women’s Council. “We are grateful for Mrs. French’s support. Endowed scholarships like this one ensure that we are able to bring more talented students into our programs.” - Diane Petrella “We are grateful for Mrs. French’s support,” says Diane Petrella, dean of the UMKC Conservatory. “Endowed scholarships like this one ensure that we are able to bring more talented students into our programs. For many of them, scholarships are the essential piece of the puzzle that makes pursuing a degree in the arts a possibility.” As an attorney, French would have been aware of the need to support women in advanced degrees. The Women’s Council Graduate Assistance Fund has provided short-term assistance to more than 2,200 women graduate students since its inception in 1970. “Every time we receive a major gift like this one from Caroline French, we know it will help countless number of women complete their research, travel to perform or present at an academic conference or afford other expenses that may otherwise stand between them and an advanced degree,” says Debbie Brooks, J.D., president of the UMKC Women’s Council board of directors. “We are fortunate that Caroline had the foresight to provide these women that opportunity.” Jun 03, 2021

  • Missouri Feels the Pain of Drug Dependency and Overdose More than Most States

    Flatland interviews professor Heather Lyons-Burney
    To pharmacist and University of Missouri-Kansas City professor Heather Lyons-Burney, one of the largest roadblocks to recovery is the stigma around addiction. Read more. Jun 03, 2021

  • Ask The Experts: Best Credit Cards Sign-Up Bonuses

    Jeff Johnson weighs-in on credit card sign-up bonuses for WalletHub
    Jeff Johnson, Ph.D., assistant professor of Marketing, Henry W. Bloch School of Management at UMKC, was featured in WalletHub’s piece about the best credit card sign-up bonuses. Read more. Jun 03, 2021

  • They Say Kansas City Is A UFO Hot Spot. Will Pentagon Report Help You Believe Them?

    Read what UMKC's Daniel McIntosh tells the Kansas City Star
    Daniel McIntosh, chairman of the department of physics and astronomy at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, hasn’t heard any of his science colleagues mention the Pentagon report. Read the full article. Subscription required. Jun 03, 2021