2021

  • UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies Earns Ninth Consecutive Top Program Ranking

    U.S. News & World Report evaluates online graduate programs
    The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing and Health Studies ranked No. 23 among the nation’s best online graduate nursing programs of 2021 by U.S. News & World Report, giving it at least a Top 30 ranking for the ninth year in a row. The UMKC ranking, released Jan. 26, is the highest of any university in Missouri or Kansas. UMKC climbed three spots from last year’s No. 26 ranking. The UMKC School of Health Studies takes pride in the continuing recognition of its online Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program as one of the best in the nation, said Joy Roberts, interim dean. This past year, it has meant more than ever. “The pandemic has demonstrated the value and the need for high-quality online nursing education,” Roberts said. “Our May and December 2020 online MSN graduates went right to work on the front lines of the battle against COVID-19 in hospitals locally, regionally and nationally.” The UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies is a pioneer in distance-learning programs, offering online advanced degree programs since 2002. The programs offer busy professionals a high-quality but convenient way to further their careers and meet the needs of an evolving health care system. Online students are expected to participate in online discussions as if they are present in the classroom. Technology offers two-way communication in real time via multiple modes. Students also experience on-site learning through summer institutes where they are required to attend clinical training or dissertation work sessions, and deliver presentations to classmates and faculty. UMKC offers a variety of online graduate nursing tracks, including Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) and other options: Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGNP) Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (NNP) Nurse Educator (NE) Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) Primary Care and Acute-Care (AC PNP) Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP) Ph.D. Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) U.S. News began ranking online education in 2012. The categories include faculty credentials and training; student engagement; admissions selectivity; peer reputation; and student services and technology. U.S. News began their data comparisons with more than 550 institutions that had accredited graduate degree programs in nursing. Among the ones that replied, more than 194 said they offered online graduate nursing programs. The number of online nursing programs is continually growing nationwide. Jan 26, 2021

  • Alumna Advocates for Black Businesses While Building her Own

    Bloch grad and former basketball player is a Dallas Black Chamber of Commerce vice president
    Our ongoing story starts with people from around the world, converging here at UMKC. Get to know our people and you’ll know what UMKC is all about. Jade Tinner ‘12 Academic program: Business Administration -- Marketing, Henry W. Bloch School of ManagementHometown: Canyon, Texas Jade Tinner runs her public relations firm, JTBE INK, while serving as vice president of community investment for the Dallas Black Chamber of Commerce. Tell us about your current position. I’m currently the vice president of community investment for the Dallas Black Chamber of Commerce. In my position, I develop and implement strategic plans to ensure that communications, programming and corporate relations are effective and support the mission and goals of the DBCC and deepen the organization’s impact in the community.  Was it solely basketball that brought you to UMKC? What else appealed to you about campus or the experience? Basketball introduced me to UMKC, but the campus and coaching staff is what influenced my decision to commit to UMKC. I also loved the fact that It was far away from my hometown. I was ready to experience something new. What was your favorite thing about UMKC? The opportunity to be involved in other activities outside of sports. During my time I served as the treasurer of The African American Student Union, won the Miss Black & Gold pageant and am a member of Delta Sigma Pi. How did you choose your field of study? I always knew I was going to own something, and I needed to learn all I could about business and all of its functions. Marketing seemed to make the most sense for me as a creative. What are the challenges of your field? The main challenge in the marketing field is the broad overgeneralized definition of “marketing.” With technology changing daily, new marketing trends emerge as soon as you learn the last one. But the challenge of competing with yourself daily to be better than the day before is exciting. What are the benefits? Marketing at this time is the era of digital everything. For a creative like myself, this gives us the opportunity to really step outside of the norm, (because what is normal now?), think outside the box and explore, test and improve new and existing marketing efforts. Has the discipline of being an athlete helped you in any way as far as digging in and getting through this challenging time? Absolutely. I always say that basketball was my first love and my first teacher. It taught me to really buckle down and work hard on myself to be in the best shape possible or  –  in the best headspace possible  –  to accomplish everything going on. Off the court, I still have to make sure that I'm taking care of myself and I'm taking care of business. Tell me a little bit about the business. What are you working on, how did it evolve and how is it working out? It’s a lot like college. I always say I was so used to being busy, especially playing basketball and being involved in other organizations on campus. I was always going. That's the still the space I operate in.  I want to be busy. I want to be doing something. I want to be helping people. "The main challenge in the marketing field is the broad overgeneralized definition of 'marketing.'" - Jade Tinner As the vice president of community investment for the Dallas Black Chamber of Commerce, we advocate for the creation growth and general welfare of Black-owned businesses in the North Texas region. I was on the board of directors before taking the full-time role as marketing director. I started the One Unified Resource Foundation  –  or OUR Foundation. The biggest initiative is mentorship for young men ages 12 to 18. We're actually getting ready to implement the program in a local high school here in Texas. It seems that the combination of philanthropy and business is part of your mission. Has giving back always been something that you've been interested in doing even before you were working? I think it just comes naturally and I feel like it’s what we're supposed to do -- or at least what I'm supposed to do. Did you see that in your family or your community growing up?   Some of the giving back was a learned behavior. And then some of it is just seeing how hard my mother worked, my grandmother worked and my great grandparents worked. They instilled that in me. Also, my grandpa always said “Never, never let someone go hungry.” So, I love feeding people whether I’m cooking at home or it's going out to eat. I love to provide an experience, whether it's through one of our organizations’ events helping these young boys, or it's an event or program through the chamber. In your opinion what are the most important areas a business owner should be focused on right now. And is it different for Black owned business than it is for business in general? There aren’t differences on what the focus needs to be, but there are differences in the way we have access to capital. I think the main focus for 2021 is obtaining enough financial capital to sustain the business. How are you going to obtain that? Are you applying for government relief funding? What is your relationship with your financial institution? One of the major differences for Black-owned businesses or minority-owned business is the lack of relationships with their financial institutions. A lot of people in the United States discovered that when the first round of relief funding happened. "I want to be busy. I want to be doing something. I want to be helping people." Another really big takeaway from 2020 is that business owners should focus on being virtually and digitally present. And we need to plan long-term. There is no timeframe of when this could be over. So, how is your business going to sustain? And then once this is “over,” business is going to look totally different. So, you need to know how your business is going to be able to stay up with the new technologies and how services are provided. Do you have predictions on how it's going to look different? The pandemic has changed so many things. For example, we know there's money that can be saved because now we know that people can work from home effectively. In addition, a lot of new businesses have been created within the year because people lost their jobs and they had to figure out ways to stay alive. They may have turned their side hustles into their full-time means of income. We've seen a lot of new businesses like this coming to the chamber. You have posted on social media about the focus on women creating wealth. Why is that a priority for you? Specifically for me and in the chamber, I've worked in male-dominated industries. Most of us do, and, being an athlete, I always dealt with assumptions like the idea of boys being better at handling the ball than girls. I want that kind of mindset to change. I’m responsible for corporate partnerships and external communication at the chamber. I wanted to see what our history was in these areas and women’s names are very, very scarce.  It’s been one of my focal points as a part of the staff to recognize that Black women are making contributions to our community and our business community. "I always dealt with assumptions like the idea of boys being better at handling the ball than girls. I want that kind of mindset to change." Right now, Black women are the number one leading demographic in the state of Texas for new startups. So, it's amazing that there is a need to bring this to people’s attention. Still, the average revenue for these businesses is around $40,000. Imagine $40,000 being your sole means of income and the capital to fund your business. So, it's very important to feed financial capital into these businesses as well as social capital, because networking with like-minded people – like-minded business owners – that you can partner with and collaborate with is part of our focus. What are your goals for the future? To change the world! Within that there are some milestones to accomplish all for the betterment of our communities.  Learn more about Jade What is one word that best describes you? Blessed Do you have a motto you live by? Let’s get LIT (Live Intentional Today)! Treat others how you want to be treated! Were you a first person in your family to attend college? I am not the first to attend college, but am the first to graduate from college. I’m the manifestation of all of the hard work my mom, grandmother, and great grandparents put in. What did you learn about yourself while you were here? I learned that I am definitely a city girl! Being in Kansas City opened my mind to all of the possibilities that are out there in the U.S. and across the world. I also learned how to be an adult, overcome obstacles and preserve through hard times. What’s your favorite place in Kansas City? My favorite place in Kansas City is the Jazz District. So much history and culture in one concentrated area. What is your advice for a student entering UMKC? Find a mentor, find your group of friends, get involved, save your money and enjoy your entire experience.   Jan 25, 2021

  • From Health Care to the Culture of Care

    Sally Ellis Fletcher shares her passion for nursing, education and social justice
    The Black Excellence At UMKC series helps to increase awareness of the representation of diversity and equity on campus and show a visible commitment to the inclusion and recognition of Black faculty and staff. This series celebrates and highlights Black and Roo faculty and staff working behind the scenes and on the frontlines to help our university achieve its mission to promote learning and discovery for all people at UMKC and the greater Kansas City community. Sally Ellis Fletcher developed her passion for education, nursing and social justice when she was just a child. She’d dissect grasshoppers and demonstrate to her toys what she was doing. As a teenager, she worked in an infirmary and enjoyed caring for the students. Having grown up in a family that was active in social justice, she was leading her first workshop by the age of 14. So, her current role as associate dean for students at the School of Nursing and Health Studies is a natural blend of the causes she cares most about. In our newest Black Excellence At UMKC feature, Ellis Fletcher shares how she combines her servant leadership and career experiences to help inspire future care providers. "While I’m not working directly in health care, the principles of patient care are still at the core of what I do." Name: Sally Ellis Fletcher Job Function: School of Nursing and Health Studies, associate dean for studentsTenure: 2015Hometown: Kansas City, MissouriUndergraduate University: Avila University (College)Graduate University:UMKC Master of Science, Nursing, Women’s Health CareUMKC Post-Master, Nurse Practitioner, Women’s Health CareUniversity of Rochester, Rochester, New York, Ph.D., Dissertation - Entrepreneurship in Nursing Why did you choose UMKC as the place to grow your career? The mission and vision of UMKC align with my personal values, especially the six core values of the School of Nursing and Health Studies: respect, inclusion and diversity, integrity, excellence, innovation and health. These values give each member of the School of Nursing and Health Studies community an equal foundation, or starting point, to learn, grow, develop and launch their dreams into the world. What do you enjoy most about working at UMKC? The students that come to UMKC trust us to guide them toward achieving their dreams. Students come through our doors with a dream for their lives and we have a big part in helping them get there. Everyone’s role is important in helping launch students into the next phase of their lives. As a nurse, you’re educated and prepared to work with everybody in the health-care system. You’re not isolated; you have to be a spiderweb. You have to think about public health, rehab, critical care, etc. So, while I’m not working directly in health care, the principles of patient care are still at the core of what I do. I transfer my nursing skills into academia. Nurses think globally, and about resources, patients/consumers will need to achieve their optimal health. When I’m helping students, I think globally about the resources available, and what needs to happen for them to succeed. I’m still functioning as a nurse, but now I’m an academic administrator in nursing education. "There’s a saying, 'nobody cares what you know, until they know that you care.' I try to always care." What are the challenges of your career field? There are never enough student scholarships. I have a vision that every student entering the School of Nursing and Health Studies would be part of a “pay it forward program.” Each student would receive 50 to 70 percent of their tuition in scholarships, with the stipulation they participate in paying it forward through recruitment, community service and post-graduation financial investment in future students. Don’t laugh, but I think about how I’d pitch this idea to Dolly Parton, Oprah and Stedman, Malinda and Bill Gates, Beyoncé and Jay-Z, or anyone else who would listen. What are the benefits of your career field? I see the future of healthcare through the potential of every student. It is truly exciting!  How do you connect and establish relationships with Black faculty and staff in other units and departments? My position keeps me very busy and, like most of us, our schedules are frequently double, or triple booked. So, I’m not always able to attend certain functions or group gatherings. Yet, humans have this magnetic power to bond together through common experiences. When serving on committees or sitting in meetings, you’re drawn to someone, friendships are created and you support one another long term. I serve on various committees and I always try to speak on behalf of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI). I’m frequently asking, “have we considered the student perspective? Have we considered DEI?” What is your primary research focus? Cultural sensibility in health care. I published a book about this at a time when people were discussing “cultural competence.” I didn’t feel that was a good term. The book explores how nurses and healthcare workers can provide proactive culturally sensible care to patients/consumers. The vignettes in the book come from some of my own experiences and experiences that others have shared with me; hopefully, they can help people see and work through their biases, prejudices and stereotypes. "I see the future of healthcare through the potential of every student. It is truly exciting!" How are you involved in the Kansas City community? I’m honored to serve on the board of Newhouse, a Kansas City shelter for individuals experiencing domestic violence. Our doors are open to women and their children, as well as men and their children. We have a new CEO that is innovatively leading the shelter to break the cycle of domestic violence. Describe your mentoring relationships with students. I always tell students that “I’m here.” I try to tear down the walls and just be real. If something happens with a student, I try to get to the root of the issue by asking more questions and listening to them and their life experiences.  There’s a saying, “nobody cares what you know until they know that you care.” I try to always care. What is one word that best describes you? A “realistic optimist.” I know, that’s two words. I see life as a glass half full, and I choose to believe the best is possible. Yet, I am very realistic.  What is one piece of advice you’d give a student wanting to follow in your footsteps? Don’t follow my footsteps, create your own path. You have talents and life experiences that make you wonderfully special to do greater things than what I do. Jan 22, 2021

  • It’s Never Too Late to Graduate

    Crankstart Scholarships are designed for nontraditional students
    Not all students take a direct path from college initiation to graduation. Sometimes circumstances intercede that require degree-seekers to take a break, but that does not mean they do not have a viable path to graduation. Vickie Goods is currently pursuing a liberal arts degree and is planning on graduating in May. It wasn’t long ago that she did not think a college degree was within her grasp. “I’d gone to college in Louisiana briefly and when I moved to Kansas City, I wanted to finish my degree.” Goods was recently divorced and a single mother. She attended a private university and exhausted her Pell Grants, but despite her efforts wasn’t able to finish. “Nothing seemed to be working out, but I was determined,” Goods says. “I was working with a woman at the Full Employment Council, and I broke down. I just felt I couldn’t get over this hump in my life, and that I really wanted to finish college.” The woman helping her told her she had options. “She said, ‘I know someone who can help.’” Goods contacted KC Degrees and received information about KC Scholars and the Crankstart Foundation Reentry Scholarships at UMKC. She was able to enroll and is planning on graduating in May 2021. “I’m so excited. Everything has been so up and down, and so many people are struggling. I’m so grateful.” “We want people to know that there are resources designed specifically for returning students.” – Katie Anton Goods is not alone in her struggle or her relief. Jessica Mason, B.A. philosophy ’20, graduated in December. Like Goods, Mason had gaps in her academic career because of economic issues and family obligations. “Katie Anton told me about the Crankstart Scholarships.” Anton is director of scholarships for the UMKC College of Arts and Sciences. “We see so many students who have worked extremely hard and feel as if graduation is out of reach because of the expense,” Anton says. “We want people to know that there are resources designed specifically for returning students. There’s always a path to graduation.” With Anton’s advice, Mason made the decision to finish her degree. “The advice I give is that you should keep an open mind and do not be intimidated by having classmates younger than you.” – Jessica Mason “The scholarship helped tremendously, especially in these times,” Mason says. “It allowed me to help pay for daycare for my youngest as well as provide little amenities that I had not foreseen such as parking passes and other fees that I encountered.” Mason has encouraged several people who were considering returning to school that they should. “The advice I give is that you should keep an open mind, and do not be intimidated by having classmates younger than you,” Mason says. “Also, try and involve yourself in groups, lectures and the experience as whole because it goes very fast.”  For more information on the Crankstart Scholarships and other paths to graduation, please contact UMKC Financial Aid and Scholarships. Jan 20, 2021

  • Johnson County Native Gets ‘Once-in-a-Lifetime’ Inauguration Job As Joe Biden’s Stand-in

    Conservatory grad featured by Shawnee Mission Post
    Kevin Cerovich grew up in the Kansas City area and attended UMKC, earning a Bachelor of Music in Jazz Trombone. Read more. Jan 20, 2021

  • Inauguration Day Is A Teachable Moment, But Not All Kansas City Schools Let Students Watch Live

    KCUR taps School of Education consultant
    “Districts are clamping down on some of the political rhetoric,” said Brett Coffman, who taught social studies for 17 years in Raytown and Liberty schools and now works as a consultant for the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Education. “I think that’s going to continue. There will be teachers that push back on that. I know that they are already.” Read more from KCUR. Jan 20, 2021

  • Mahomes' Playoff Outlook

    KCUR taps Chi-Ming Huang
    Chi-Ming Huang, professor, UMKC School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, was a guest on Up to Date. Jan 20, 2021

  • Nursing School Class Examines COVID-19, From Emergence to Vaccines

    Public health course combines underlying science and the challenges of pandemic response.
    Designing a course from scratch is no easy task. And when the subject matter is changing constantly, you have a real challenge on your hands. But that’s what two assistant professors at the School of Nursing and Health Studies, Joseph Lightner and Sharon White-Lewis, did for the fall 2020 semester. “When we realized this was a pandemic and something the world knew little about, those of us in public health said, ‘Someone should teach a course about this.’ And then we realized ‘someone’ was us,” said Lightner, who holds a master’s in public health and a doctorate in kinesiology and leads the nursing school’s bachelor of public health degree program. So he and White-Lewis, whose expertise includes disaster preparedness and response, designed a comprehensive course on the COVID-19 pandemic. It covered a lot of ground, from the history of the 1918 flu pandemic to what the coronavirus is, how it spreads and how it acts in a body, to COVID-19 treatments and vaccines, contact tracing and the country’s emergency preparedness and response in the first nine months of the pandemic. Teaching about an unfolding pandemic also was a new challenge. White-Lewis said they frequently reacted to developments, quickly gathering reliable information and incorporating it into lectures and exercises. From left, Assistant Professors Joseph Lightner and Sharon White-Lewis taught the course to 37 students including Lejla Skender and Denise Dean. Everyone in the class took an online Johns Hopkins University course to become certified contract tracers. They also worked in teams to try to determine who brought COVID to the White House reception for Supreme Court nominee Amy Barrett Cohen. “That was a fascinating exercise,” said Denise Dean, a senior working on a health sciences degree with a concentration in public health. “We worked in teams with data on everyone in attendance: when they showed symptoms, when they tested positive and had tested negative, and other activities they had engaged in. We had numbered photos, too, to show which people were close to each other.” Dean, who has done research projects of her own and is an undergraduate research assistant, added, “We had learned in lectures when people are most contagious in relation to when they show symptoms, which helped us narrow the possible carriers.” Lightner said the teams were able to determine three people in attendance who were the most likely to have brought the virus to that group of key government officials, though with this virus it could have been someone else who showed no symptoms. “That’s another thing the students learned: Public health can be messy and complicated,” Lightner said. Your final: What do you do when a pandemic strikes? The final exam was a drill on responding to a pandemic, said White-Lewis, who advised those who drew up the Kansas City area’s vaccine distribution plan and leads the area’s nine-county Medical Reserve Corps, a network of medical and public health volunteers. Lejle Skender, a senior biology major considering medical school, said, “It was great to learn how all the parts of the medical system need to work together — who’s doing what behind the scenes to make sure people and materials are available in the right places.” Dean added: “And we learned what happens when there’s an emergency and a good plan isn’t in place.” The course had wide appeal, drawing 37 students, including nursing graduate students and undergraduates from majors including nursing, pre-pharmacy, public health, health sciences and biology. That student mix provided some challenges, Lightener said, “because we had to make sure the undergrads had enough of the basic sciences to understand when we got into the etiology, epidemiology and pathology of the virus and the disease.” It also gave students access to dozens of other perspectives, especially on discussion boards that White-Lewis posted. “The class was a big jumble of backgrounds and majors, but we all had the goal of learning about this virus and how that knowledge could benefit us in our careers,” Skender said. “We all learned from each other because, for example, some of us started with more science knowledge to share, and the graduate student nurses gave us a lot of information from their perspective as nurses.” She added, “If the course is taught again, I would recommend it to anyone interested in a health care career.” “That’s another thing the students learned: Public health can be messy and complicated.”   — Assistant Professor Joseph Lightner White-Lewis, who earned her doctorate in nursing from UMKC in 2018, said the student discussions were valuable and enriching but often difficult. “In the module on vaccines we did a discussion where they had to take 10 of their family and friends and decide who gets the five vaccine doses available and who could die,” White-Lewis said. “For me, it was really hard hearing from students who had family members who have died of COVID, and how they wished that everyone would take the virus much more seriously.” Lightner said that it would be great to offer the course again, but that that did not seem possible without more resources dedicated to it. “It was great to develop the course and fit it in somehow last fall,” he said. “But Dr. White-Lewis and I both are research faculty who have to do our own research. I’m director of our public health degree program, and she teaches graduate research and has her emergency response and other duties.”   Whether the course can be taught again, Lightner said, “I think it’s clear this information is vital. However well the vaccines do, the evidence is mounting that practitioners are going to be dealing with COVID and its long-term effects for years to come.”   Jan 19, 2021

  • Music Schools Struggle To Diversify

    Columbia Missourian wrote about the music programs at UM System schools
    UMKC has the most degrees awarded annually among three UM System campuses that have music major programs, with about 500. Over the past decade, Black students have represented 4% of the graduates, and that number was no better in 2019. But its white population earning degrees is down to 65% in 2019, the lowest during the past 10 years. Read the full article. Jan 17, 2021

  • Patrick Mahomes Has A Little Extra Work Before He’s Eligible To Play In AFC Title Game Sunday

    Fox4KC interviews Margaret Gibson
    “You can kind of see that when he came up that he definitely wasn’t jumping back and ready to go,” Margaret Gibson, associate professor at UMKC School of Medicine, said. “He was a little bit wobbly and had to have some assistance.” Read the article and watch the newscast. Jan 17, 2021

  • UMKC Faculty Weigh-In

    Media tap UMKC professors when covering KC businesses' political spending on Josh Hawley
    “It’s not insignificant,” Greg Vonnahme, chairman of the political science department at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, said of company donations. “But a majority of their money is going to come from individual donors.” - Kansas City Star (subscription required) Jan 17, 2021

  • Local Creative Arts Are Getting Creative

    The Pitch reports on ways Kansas City arts organizations are partnering with others, including UMKC, during the pandemic
    Kansas City Lyric Opera created a series focused on local partnerships called New Visions. It includes an eight-part digital history of opera, presented by musicologists from UMKC and KU and featuring art from the Nelson-Atkins Museum. Read more. Jan 15, 2021

  • KC Business Survey: Entrepreneurs Increasingly Confident In Full Recovery From Pandemic

    Local media report on the survey, which KCSourceLink helped conduct
    “By nature, entrepreneurs and small business owners are problem solvers — they rise to a challenge — and 2020 certainly doled out more than its fair share,” said Maria Meyers, executive director of the UMKC Innovation Center and founder of KCSourceLink, which helped lead the survey. - Startland News Maria Meyers, executive director of the UMKC Innovation Center and Founder of SourceLink, said entrepreneurs and small business owners are naturals at solving problems and quickly did so when faced with all the challenges 2020 had to offer. - Kansas City Pitch     Jan 15, 2021

  • Free COVID-19 Testing For Students

    Rapid diagnostic tests available by appointment
    Rapid COVID-19 testing is available free to all students, whether or not they are experiencing symptoms. The test involves anterior nose swabbing, much less discomforting than interior nose swabbing. Results take about 15 minutes. Appointments can be made online or by calling 816-235-6133.  The free tests are antigen tests that detect specific proteins from the virus. Student Health and Wellness, room 237, 5110 Oak St. (Brookside 51 Building) is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and closed on holidays. Starting in February, free COVID-19 testing also will be available to UMKC faculty and staff. More details will be available soon. Jan 14, 2021

  • Free Dental Cleaning at UMKC

    Help yourself by helping dental hygiene students with their exams
    Haven’t had a dental cleaning in a few years? The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry dental hygiene students are screening patients for their clinical licensing exam, which includes a free dental cleaning. Qualifications: You must have No braces. Most teeth present. No dental cleanings in the past two to four years. No need for immediate dental services such as extraction. All day available April 30. Sign up: Call 816-508-5858 and leave a voicemail, or email umkcdhboards2021@gmail.com and include full name, phone number with area code and date of birth. Scheduling an appointment is required before coming in. When/where: Screenings will be held Tuesday through Friday starting Jan. 19 through the end of April at the UMKC School of Dentistry, 650 E. 25th St., Kansas City. COVID-19 precautions: To ensure safety, the UMKC School of Dentistry is following current guidelines from the CDC, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the American Dental Association and the American Dental Hygienists’ Association. The UMKC School of Dentistry delivers clinical care to more than 60,000 patients each year in the Kansas City area. Jan 13, 2021

  • Kansas City Theater Spotlights Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson And Other Motown Music

    UMKC Theatre's virtual co-production is featured
    “Brainstorm: The Inside Life of the Teenage Mind,” a virtual co-production of the Coterie Theatre and UMKC Theatre, will be available Jan. 19 through Feb. 7. Get more information from the Kansas City Star. This story was picked up by MSN Entertainment. Jan 13, 2021

  • UMKC Developing New Master Plan for Campuses

    Comprehensive, long-range vision for university’s physical environment
    The University of Missouri-Kansas City is embarking on a campus master planning process. A master plan is a long-range vision for the physical environment of the university’s two campuses. The plan will be designed to support the university’s goals, the role it plays in Kansas City’s future and the needs and desires of the university’s valued neighbors. Elements to be studied and refined in the process include student housing, green space, classroom and laboratory design, space utilization and support for the student life experience. The plan will take into account the realities of the university’s financial situation, and focus initially on maximizing the efficient use of existing buildings and spaces. The plan will also look to the future and chart a course for expansion into key growth areas such as student housing as resources become available. The existing UMKC Master Plan, created in 2014, needs to be updated to reflect new conditions. First and foremost, the master plan must be guided by, and serve the goals of, the 2018-2028 UMKC Strategic Plan. It will take into account that the streetcar will extend to our campus, further connecting us to the city. In addition, factors such as the UMKC Forward process and our short- and long-term needs for student services, academic programming and community engagement, must be taken into account. UMKC is working with the firm Ayers Saint Gross to create a collaborative process designed to build consensus. A working group representing a wide array of UMKC stakeholders has been assembled and began working with ASG professionals in November 2020 to assess existing conditions. The entire campus community will have opportunities to participate and be heard. UMKC has developed a Master Plan website where we will to share updates and alert the campus community to future opportunities for participation and input. The goal is to produce a recommended plan for consideration by the Board of Curators at the board meeting in June. “Our mission of teaching, research and service is constant, but the means we employ to deliver on that mission must adapt to changing conditions,” Agrawal said in a letter to campus. “This master plan process is an opportunity for our community to come together to decide how our physical environment and footprint must adapt to provide maximum support for that mission.” Jan 12, 2021

  • UMKC School of Pharmacy: Where Opportunities Abound

    As the world becomes more aware of the growing skill sets of today’s pharmacists, the roles they play in health care will continue to evolve and ex...
    Janelle Sabo, Pharm.D., R.Ph., M.B.A., is a 2000 graduate of the UMKC School of Pharmacy. An executive leader in clinical research design, development and delivery, she serves as the global head of clinical innovation, system and clinical supply chain at Eli Lilly and Company. She has accountability for the overall development, registration and launch of anti-COVID-19 therapeutics across the globe. What do you most enjoy about your job?  In my role, I leverage virtually every aspect of my education, including physics, calculus and the full pharmacy curriculum. The key difference is that I am not evaluating known information and data, but helping design and deliver critical information to inform health care professionals how a new treatment may be useful and practically utilized in a given disease state.  What does a typical day look like in your role?  My typical day involves four key focus areas: Portfolio and clinical research design and delivery, development and scaling of critical capabilities to enable clinical research, developing people, and external engagement with industry groups, vendors, regulators and other key partners. Why did you decide on pharmacy as a career choice?  I have loved science since I was young and wanted to help people. While I considered being a doctor, I was quickly drawn to the way medications can fundamentally improve and/or cure those who need help the most. I wanted there to be more options, especially in unmet medical therapeutic areas and pediatrics. How do you see the role of pharmacists evolving in the future? There is a world of roles beyond the traditional pharmacy that is growing. I have pharmacists in virtually every aspect of my organization – from data to clinical investigational pharmacy, from mobile and decentralized research to investigator training, from clinical trial design to clinical trial development and delivery. The pharmacy curriculum combined with in-clinic experience is invaluable in drug development. It opens many opportunities. What do you do outside of work for fun?  I enjoy time with my family and friends, traveling both domestically and internationally, hiking, and time by the pool in the summers. What is your best advice for someone thinking about a career in pharmacy?  Pharmacy is not just what you see today behind the counter or in the hospital. There are many opportunities in industry, academia, research, consulting and related industries. These broader opportunities require a solid foundation academically and exploration early in your schooling as internships, externships and exposure will increase your ability to pursue them post residency or fellowship. Why would you encourage someone to pick the UMKC School of Pharmacy?  UMKC has been well-ranked for more than 30 years, with a strong history of producing excellent graduates that have gone on to be leaders in their field. UMKC graduates have been successful in a variety of pharmacy settings and blazed new career paths. The masters and Ph.D. programs are solid with excellent scientist who care deeply about their areas of research. How did your time at the UMKC School of Pharmacy prepare you for your current role?  UMKC School of Pharmacy provided me organizational leadership opportunities, and supported and recommended me for critical internships in the summers. It also provided me an excellent academic and clinical foundation to build from as I launched into my career in clinical research and drug development. Jan 12, 2021

  • 8 Ways Heroic Local Doctors Have Gone Above And Beyond During The Pandemic

    Kansas City Magazine features three UMKC faculty
    Barbara Pahud, M.D.; Steve Waldman, M.D.; and Mary Anne Jackson, M.D.; were featured in this article. Jan 12, 2021

  • Story Behind Viral Picture Of Man Holding Confederate Flag Inside U.S. Capitol

    History Department Chair weighs-in with KCTV5
    Chester Owens Jr. said when he saw the image of the man holding a confederate flag inside the U.S. Capitol building, he immediately thought of his grandfather who was born into slavery. Other historians also took note of the historical irony on social media. Diane Mutti Burke, professor and chair of the Department of History at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, said she caught wind of the photograph online. Read the full article and watch the newscast. Jan 12, 2021

  • More Patients Use Crowdsourced Fundraising Campaigns To Cover Healthcare Costs

    National media cover research by UMKC School of Medicine faculty
    At least two national publications, US News & World Report and MDalert, wrote about a study by UMKC School of Medicine faculty John Spertus, senior author; and Suveen Angraal, study author. The research looked at the role of fundraising sites such as GoFundMe has played in crowdsourcing funds for medical costs over the past several years.   Jan 12, 2021

  • Trump’s Business Prospects Just Got Dimmer As Wall Street Backs Away From Tarnished Brand

    CNBC interviews Bill Black
    “Presumably he’ll do what he’s done at least five times in his career, which is strategic bankruptcy,” said William Black, associate professor of economics and law at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Read more. Jan 12, 2021

  • College Students Found Mental Health To Be A Major Issue In 2020

    Two UMKC students were guests on KCUR
    Brandon Henderson, a senior at UMKC and former Student Government Association president; and Gracie Wrinkle, a senior at UMKC and former sorority president of Alpha Delta Pi, were guests on Up to Date. Listen to the podcast on the KCUR website. Jan 12, 2021

  • Kansas City Organization Focuses On Latinx Representation In Education

    Northeast News consults with Ivan Ramirez
    Ivan Ramirez, coordinator of the Avanzando Mentoring Program, a mentoring program for Latinx students at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, said that for students thinking about joining the education field, being a part of LEC is a must. Read more. Jan 12, 2021

  • Are Cities A Safe Place To Live During A Pandemic?

    Bdnews24 talked to public health researchers including Jenifer Allsworth at UMKC
    Cities also tend to offer a larger variety of social support services, said Jenifer Allsworth, a public health researcher at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, including various child care and public transportation options. Read the full article. Jan 09, 2021

  • AAP Issues New Guidelines for Diagnosing, Managing Eating Disorders

    Medscape quotes Laurie L. Hornberger
    In a separate interview with Pediatric News, Laurie L. Hornberger, MD, MPH, associate professor of pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, explained that eating disorders occur across the spectrum of races, ethnicities, sexes and socioeconomic statuses, so “getting caught up in that stereotype can cause you to overlook kids with significant problems.” Hornberger is lead author of a new clinical report on eating disorders in children and adolescents prepared by the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Adolescence. Read the Medscape article. Jan 08, 2021

  • Human Mobility and the Spread of COVID-19

    Computer science professor Yusuf Sarwar Uddin worked on this award-winning data analysis project
    While we know that human mobility is among the leading causes of COVID-19 spread, the extent of the relationship remains unclear. School of Computing and Engineering Assistant Professor Yusuf Sarwar Uddin and two teammates from the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at the University of California, Irvine – including his wife Dr. Rezwana Rafiq – say that information is important to know if policymakers want to make informed decisions on how to limit the spread. The team was one of seven novel data science projects that received cash awards from leading enterprise artificial intelligence software provider, C3.ai. The C3.ai COVID-19 Grand Challenge represents an opportunity to inform decision makers at the local, state and federal levels and transform the way the world confronts this pandemic. A total of $200,000 in cash prizes was awarded to these research teams. The UMKC/UC Irvine team received $12,500 as one of the four third-place winners. About the research While we know measures like physical distance and mask wearing are already ongoing mandates recommended by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the extent of the relationship between human mobility and the virus spread remain unclear, at least in quantitative sense. Using U.S. county-level data from multiple sources during the first pandemic wave in May 2020, Uddin and team built a latent structural regression model to identify the causal relationships between human mobility indicators (trips, distance traveled, staying at home and social distancing) and COVID-19 spread to inform how policymakers should act. Though the team did not provide an official recommendation, they are continuing to develop the model in meaningful ways using data analysis and artificial intelligence to make informed decisions. View the presentation Jan 07, 2021

  • Computing and Engineering Professor Named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

    Reza Derakhshani developed EyeVerify technology
    Reza Derakhshani, professor in the UMKC School of Computing and Engineering, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Derakhshani is best known for leading the development of a biometric technology that makes the eye the only password needed to secure smartphones and mobile devices. The product is known as Eyeprint and was commercialized by the Kansas City-based startup EyeVerify. EyeVerify was acquired by Ant Financial Services Group in 2016 for a reported $100 million. The company is maintaining its headquarters in Kansas City and has been doing business as ZOLOZ since 2017. Derakhshani continues consulting as EyeVerify’s chief scientist while maintaining his faculty position at UMKC. At UMKC, Derakhshani heads the Computational Intelligence and Bio-Identification Technologies Laboratory (CIBIT). The lab’s research focus is ocular and vascular biometrics, mobile security, anti-spoofing and machine learning. CIBIT is also engaged in developing related novel hardware platforms for computational imaging schemes as related to biometrics, in addition to human-computer interaction. The 2020 Class of Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors will be inducted at the NAI 10th annual meeting in June 2021. UMKC Chancellor Mauli Agrawal nominated Derakhshani as an NAI Fellow. The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and nonprofit research institutes, with more than 4,000 individual inventor members and fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. Jan 06, 2021

  • Honoring An Architectural Leader

    Professor Theodore H. Seligson was respected throughout the region
    Theodore “Ted” Seligson (1930-2021) was a professor of architecture at UMKC for 30 years. A Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, Seligson was a true Renaissance man: architect, urban and interior designer, professor, fine art consultant and curator. In his spare time, he was a semi-professional violin player, reader of hieroglyphics, historic preservation activist, antiquarian, lover of comics, compulsive teacher and raconteur, according to his obituary in the Kansas City Star. Friends, colleagues, students and former students shared memories of him. “Ted Seligson was a unique and thoughtful professor who truly cared about his students and their success,” said Jacob A. Wagner, associate professor, director of UMKC Urban Studies. “He taught in Architecture and Urban Design, but he could have easily taught Art History and Archaeology. As a professional architect he worked for Kivett and Myers before starting his own firm. The buildings he designed and worked to save as a preservationist still shape the city today.” Seligson graduated from Shawnee Mission North High School and Washington University, where he also worked as a visiting professor for 30 years. His work received many local and national awards and is highlighted by such projects as Temple B’nai Jehudah, Bartle Hall Convention Center, Missouri Public Service building, Fire Station No. 30, several UMB bank buildings, Maple Woods Community College, Seaboard Corporation offices and many striking residences. “Ted Seligson was a kind and thoughtful educator, committed to developing students and their individual visions,” said Kati Toivanen, interim dean, UMKC College of Arts and Sciences. “He generously shared his wide range of professional experiences and benefited generations of our students. He will be greatly missed.” Students left tributes on Linkedin: “I was lucky enough to have him as a professor for my studio's class. His observations and teachings in the AUPD department at UMKC were incredibly valued and his insight will be deeply missed.” “Ted touched so many lives, he was truly the best teacher I ever had.” “He influenced so many and was a great teacher. I loved listening to all his stories and lessons. ‘Did you know it can rain up?’” “The passing of a Titan. So many good memories.” Counseling services are available for students, faculty and staff through UMKC Counseling Services. Seligson is survived by a legion of friends, peers, clients and students who admired him. He was a member of Temple B’nai Jehudah. A private ceremony was conducted at Rose Hill Cemetery. Memorials may be sent to the Seligson Fund c/o UMKC Foundation at 5115 Oak, AC202 Kansas City, Mo, 64112. Seligson held a fundamental belief that every person has the ability to make our community and country a better place to live. The Seligson Fund will continue to foster his legacy through public lectures and scholarships for architects and urban planning students at UMKC. Jan 06, 2021

  • COVID Means Higher Education Must Adapt. UMKC Is Taking The Lead To Reimagine Its Future

    Marc Hill mentioned the UMKC Forward initiative in his Kansas City Star opinion piece
    This op-ed column from the Kansas City Star mentions the UMKC Forward program, which seeks to focus the university on its strengths that tomorrow’s workforce will require. (subscription required) Jan 06, 2021

  • The Big Student Debt Questions That Biden Will Have To Answer

    Economics professor's study on loan forgiveness provides insight
    “You’re not getting it paid off now, and you probably never will,” says Scott Fullwiler, an economics professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and co-author of a landmark 2018 study on loan forgiveness. Read the full article from Bloomberg Business. Jan 06, 2021

  • Media Turn To UMKC Professors

    Political Science and School of Law professors weigh in on Electoral College, Capitol riots, impeachment, 25th Amendment
    Local media outlets have interviewed UMKC Department of Political Science and UMKC School of Law professors this week about the Electoral College and riots at the U.S. Capitol. We've gathered those headlines: UMKC professor calls storming of US Capitol unprecedented - KMBC - Beth Vonnahme U.S. Capitol riots 'almost entirely unprecedented,' UMKC professor says - KSHB and picked up by Yahoo News - Rebecca Best U.S. Capitol has never seen chaos quite like this - Fox4KC - Rebecca Best What's next following the assault on the Capitol? - KCTV5 - Greg Vonnahme Few consequences for angry white men — what if Black rioters attempted a Capitol coup? - Kansas City Star - Jamila Jefferson-Jones Impeachment, 25th Amendment: Explained by UMKC constitutional law scholar - KCTV5 - Allen Rostron UMKC professor explains 25th Amendment as calls grow for Trump’s removal - KSHB - Greg Vonnahme       Jan 06, 2021

  • Ted Seligson, One Of Kansas City’s Leading Architects Of 20th Century, Dies From COVID

    Kansas City Star reports celebration of life
    This was from the Kansas City Star Opinion Page: “He was devoted to improving Kansas City and a big advocate for urbanism in Kansas City,” said Michael Frisch, department chair for architecture, urban planning and design at UMKC. (subscription required) Jan 06, 2021

  • UMKC Professor Weighs In On Electoral College Vote Objections

    KSHB interviews Beth Vonnahme
    Beth Vonnahme, associate professor of American politics at UMKC, said Wednesday’s ceremony will be unusual. Read the story and watch the newscast on KSHB. This story was picked up by Yahoo News. Jan 05, 2021

  • Why Senator Hawley Is Objecting To Electoral College Votes

    KCUR taps Edward Cantu
    Edward Cantu, associate professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, was a guest on Up to Date. As this story unfolds, more UMKC faculty are interviewed about Josh Hawley and blowback from his objections and the Capitol riots. Debra Leiter on KSHB, Allen Rostron on Fox4KC.  Jan 05, 2021

  • UMKC School of Pharmacy: Where Opportunities Abound

    UMKC School of Pharmacy alumna, Janelle Sabo, shares insight on the ever-changing field of health care and pharmaceuticals with a look inside her p...
    As the world becomes more aware of the growing skill sets of today’s pharmacists, the roles they play in health care will continue to evolve and expand. Our UMKC School of Pharmacy graduates are working in a vast array of health care fields. Janelle Sabo, Pharm.D., R.Ph., M.B.A., is a 2000 graduate of the UMKC School of Pharmacy. An executive leader in clinical research design, development and delivery, she serves as the global head of clinical innovation, system and clinical supply chain at Eli Lilly and Company. She is accountability for the overall development, registration and launch of anti-COVID-19 therapeutics across the globe. What do you most enjoy about your job? In my role, I leverage virtually every aspect of my education, including physics, calculus and the full pharmacy curriculum. The key difference is that I am not evaluating known information and data, but helping design and deliver critical information to inform health care professionals how a new treatment may be useful and practically utilized in a given disease state.  What does a typical day look like in your role?  My typical day involves four key focus areas: Portfolio and clinical research design and delivery, development and scaling of critical capabilities to enable clinical research, developing people, and external engagement with industry groups, vendors, regulators and other key partners. Why did you decide on pharmacy as a career choice?  I have loved science since I was young and wanted to help people. While I considered being a doctor, I was quickly drawn to the way medications can fundamentally improve and/or cure those who need help the most. I wanted there to be more options, especially in unmet medical therapeutic areas and pediatrics. How do you see the role of pharmacists evolving in the future? There is a world of roles beyond the traditional pharmacy that is growing. I have pharmacists in virtually every aspect of my organization – from data to clinical investigational pharmacy, from mobile and decentralized research to investigator training, from clinical trial design to clinical trial development and delivery. The pharmacy curriculum combined with in-clinic experience is invaluable in drug development. It opens many opportunities. What do you do outside of work for fun?  I enjoy time with my family and friends, traveling both domestically and internationally, hiking, and time by the pool in the summers. What is your best advice for someone thinking about a career in pharmacy?  Pharmacy is not just what you see today behind the counter or in the hospital. There are many opportunities in industry, academia, research, consulting and related industries. These broader opportunities require a solid foundation academically and exploration early in your schooling as internships, externships and exposure will increase your ability to pursue them post residency or fellowship. Why would you encourage someone to pick the UMKC School of Pharmacy?  UMKC has been well-ranked for more than 30 years, with a strong history of producing excellent graduates that have gone on to be leaders in their field. UMKC graduates have been successful in a variety of pharmacy settings and blazed new career paths. The masters and Ph.D. programs are solid with excellent scientist who care deeply about their areas of research. How did your time at the UMKC School of Pharmacy prepare you for your current role?  UMKC School of Pharmacy provided me organizational leadership opportunities, and supported and recommended me for critical internships in the summers. It also provided me an excellent academic and clinical foundation to build from as I launched into my career in clinical research and drug development. Dec 17, 2020